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  • A "taxing" issue...

    i've seen this before other places, but it was time to put it up as a reminder of what is coming our way. Notice how the "spread" against the high tax on metals is narrowing. I don;t see anything here that will be good for the stock market.

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/david-...shock-syndrome

    David Rosenberg On Taxation-Shock-Syndrome


    Submitted by Tyler Durden on 02/21/2012 22:07 -0500

    While nothing is more certain than death and taxes (and central bank largesse), David Rosenberg of Gluskin Sheff uncovers The Unlucky Seven major tax-related uncertainties facing households and businesses that will likely lead to multiple compression in markets (rather than the much-heralded multiple expansion 'story' which appears to have topped the talking-head charts - just above 'money on the sidelines' and 'wall of worry', as 'earnings-driven' arguments are failing on the back of this quarter). As he notes the radically changed taxation climate in 2013 and beyond will have an impact on all economic participants as they will probably opt to bolster their cash reserves in the second half of the year in preparation for the proverbial rainy day.

    First, the top marginal personal tax rate rises to 39.6% from 35% as the Bush tax cuts expire at the end of 2012.

    Second, a limit on itemized deductions will add a further 1.2 percentage points to the top rate.

    Third, a new 0.9% Medicare tax on incomes over $200,000 gets imposed ($250,000 for joint filers).

    Fourth, the top 15% rate on long-term capital gains rises to 20%.

    Fifth, dividends will once again be taxed at ordinary rates 39.6% for the top income earners.

    Sixth, a new 3.8% tax on investment income gets introduced for incomes over $200,000 ($250.000 for joint filers).

    Seventh, the top estate tax rate goes from 35% to 55% (60% in some cases). The estate tax exemption falls to $1 million from $5 million (the gift-tax exemption also drops to $1 million and the rate adjusts hither to 55%).

    Forty-one separate tax provisions expire this year see page 32 of the Economist. Of course, there is always the chance that after the November 6th election, a Congress that can never seem to allow anything temporary to meet its expiry date will pass an extension for more on all this, see More Uncertainty for 2013 on page B9 of the Weekend WSJ.

  • #2
    Re: A "taxing" issue...

    I'd just note that assuming all the 'expiring' programs will actually expire is a pretty big assumption.

    Obama is already talking about reducing taxes.

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    • #3
      Re: A "taxing" issue...

      Originally posted by c1ue View Post
      I'd just note that assuming all the 'expiring' programs will actually expire is a pretty big assumption.

      Obama is already talking about reducing taxes
      .
      and a zig to the right here and a zag over to the left there, is gen'l how basketball players score points:

      so... if deficits are a/the problem: "cut taxes" (like FICA, when socsec/medicare are already near bankrupt, makes perfect sense... right?... uh huh...)

      and if jobs and energy are a big issue: nix the pipeline to canada, stop/sandbag drilling off the coasts and dont even mention nuclear, unless its to infer its too risky (as in: might lose the green/left vote)

      and then we'll distract em with biz-subsidized birth control and gay marriage, while the banksters get clean away with billions...

      damn!... this guy is sharper than we thot....

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: A "taxing" issue...

        http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...LEFTTopStories

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: A "taxing" issue...

          Originally posted by c1ue View Post
          I'd just note that assuming all the 'expiring' programs will actually expire is a pretty big assumption.

          Obama is already talking about reducing taxes.
          I think these temporary budgets (continuing authorization, I think), temporary extensions, etc, will become the norm going ahead, what better way but to overwhelm the public with a slew of uncertainty and reasons to make pleas to the feds?

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