Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A sober review of energy policy vs. carbon emissions limitations via taxation

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • A sober review of energy policy vs. carbon emissions limitations via taxation

    http://www.itif.org/files/2010-green-economy-myths.pdf

    Interesting points:

    1) Reduction of world carbon emissions by 50% by 2050 doesn't mean reduction of present emissions by 50%. It actually means reduction of present emissions by 86% since the world population will grow by 46% in the intervenng period

    2) Increasing energy costs via carbon emissions taxation is unlikely to actually encourage alternative energy. Europe has tremendously higher energy costs but a far lower (in fact nonexistent) electric car population.

    Clearly then a $15/ton CO2 tax (equivalent to 15% increase in gasoline prices) is unlikely to do better than the European equivalent of a $400/ton CO2 tax.

    3) Simply driving up energy costs is unlikely itself to actually spur innovation. For one thing, major innovation requires planning or at least a coherent goal.

    Saying higher energy prices will drive alternative energy is just as neo-liberal economics-wise as saying higher home ownership is better for society.

  • #2
    Re: A sober review of energy policy vs. carbon emissions limitations via taxation

    in 40 years they will sit around and laugh at the current fools setting policy.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: A sober review of energy policy vs. carbon emissions limitations via taxation

      Originally posted by chr5648 View Post
      in 40 years they will sit around and laugh at the current fools setting policy.
      This theory is testable. Are we laughing at those who set policy in the 1970's?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: A sober review of energy policy vs. carbon emissions limitations via taxation

        Originally posted by Ghent12 View Post
        This theory is testable. Are we laughing at those who set policy in the 1970's?
        Depends what point of view, if you lost your job to globalization or cheap chinese manufacturing, then maybe you are crying. There was an opportunity to start developing some renewable technology back in the 70's now people cry at gas pump prices. Not to mention the gold standard ending. I did not live in the 70's but have to live with their buffoonery, I laugh at the past zoo of so called 'leaders' and the current. Let's see what new program of policies and magic tricks they have for the next generation.

        Comment

        Working...
        X