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Bernanke:- We lost control

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  • Bernanke:- We lost control

    http://www.silverdoctors.com/bernank...taper-in-2013/

    He con-ter-dicks himself everytime he opens his month...........
    He reminds me of that Airfrance plane that crashed into the sea a few years ago........they knew they were crashing but powerless to stop it........ (laws of aero-dymanics can't be spun into a CDO)
    Mike

  • #2
    Re: Bernanke:- We lost control

    Originally posted by Mega View Post
    http://www.silverdoctors.com/bernank...taper-in-2013/

    He con-ter-dicks himself everytime he opens his month...........
    He reminds me of that Airfrance plane that crashed into the sea a few years ago........they knew they were crashing but powerless to stop it........ (laws of aero-dymanics can't be spun into a CDO)
    Mike
    Your Air France analogy is not bad, but it deserves better understanding of why they crash.
    In a nutshell :
    1. they lost instruments due to icing
    2. they did not see they were stalling (believing slow air speed alarm was a false positive),
    3. they pulled on the stick like mad while they should pushed on it, to put the plane in a descending path, regaining lift and
    flyability.
    4. When they finally understood and tried that, it was too late too low.
    The whole thing in 4 mins.

    _____________________
    "In a July 2011 article in Aviation Week, retired airline captain, aviation safety expert and accident investigator C. B. "Sully" Sullenberger was quoted as saying the crash was a "seminal accident."
    We need to look at it from a systems approach, a human/technology system that has to work together. This involves aircraft design and certification, training and human factors. If you look at the human factors alone, then you're missing half or two-thirds of the total system failure...
    Sullenberger suggested that pilots would be able to better handle upsets of this type if they had an indication of the wing's angle of attack (AoA). "We have to infer angle of attack indirectly by referencing speed. That makes stall recognition and recovery that much more difficult. For more than half a century, we've had the capability to display AoA (in the cockpits of most jet transports), one of the most critical parameters, yet we choose not to do it."
    In the Final Report (Section 4.2.2 - page 205) the BEA recommends that EASA and the FAA evaluate the relevance of requiring the presence of an angle of attack indicator directly accessible to pilots on board aeroplanes.
    In a July 2012 CBS report, Sullenberger suggests that the design of the Airbus cockpit played a significant factor in the accident. The flight controls are not linked between the two pilot seats, and the left seat pilot was not aware that the right seat pilot was holding the stick back the entire time."

    Ben may need a AoA display…

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    • #3
      Re: Bernanke:- We lost control

      Hmmmmmmmmmmmm...........Don't fly Air France

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Bernanke:- We lost control

        FYI : No major has AoA in cockpit. Better fly Sullenberger…

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Bernanke:- We lost control

          Originally posted by kantx View Post
          FYI : No major has AoA in cockpit. Better fly Sullenberger…
          He retired, and is now the volunteer Chair of the EAA's Young Eagle program. His First Officer on the Hudson River flight, Jeff Skiles, now works for the EAA.

          An Angle of Attack indication would have given the Air France pilots a more direct situational awareness indication, but there's no excuse for what happened to that flight. In a modern swept wing transport jet there's a small range between high altitude cruise configuration and stall...and every pilot who flies those airplanes knows that.

          One of the earliest things a student pilot learns is the relationship between pitch angle and airspeed, and between thrust (throttle) and altitude - and how the airplane behaves differently on the back side of the power curve. It must have been a terrifying experience for the Air France pilots to be descending at 10,000 ft per minute with the throttles at maximum thrust. However, there's only one way that can happen when the nose is above the artificial horizon. A recollection of some of their basic stick and rudder training might have been as helpful as yet more instrument technology in the panel. That was one of the most critical factors for why Sullenberger and Skiles got their airplane down in one piece.
          Last edited by GRG55; 07-18-13, 10:58 AM.

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          • #6
            Re: Bernanke:- We lost control

            Originally posted by GRG55 View Post
            He retired. And his First Officer on the Hudson River flight, Jeff Skiles, now works for the EAA.

            An Angle of Attack indication would have given the Air France pilots a more direct situational awareness indication, but there's no excuse for what happened to that flight. In a modern swept wing transport jet there's a very small difference between high altitude cruise configuration and stall...and every pilot who flies those airplanes knows that.

            One of the earliest things a student pilot learns is the relationship between pitch angle and airspeed, and between thrust (throttle) and altitude - and how the airplane behaves differently on the back side of the power curve. It must have been a terrifying experience for the Air France pilots to be descending at 10,000 ft per minute with the throttles at maximum thrust. But a recollection of some of their basic stick and rudder training might have been as helpful as yet another instrument on the panel.
            Sound reasoning. Being the son of an ex-Air France captain myself, who's been first a fighter pilot, I know the older generation of flying officers regrets avionics comes at the expense of "fly with the pants" basics (exactly what allowed Sully to pull off the most fantastic safe crash of aviation history). My father and his friend captains used to say nowadays "virtual flying" pilots often ignore basic rules of gliding — plus some glitches in training due to Air France history in "return from experience".
            Tragically, Air France had one of the oldest and best flying tradition and partly squandered it, making for itself one of the worst accident record companies among the old majors.
            The Concorde crash had the writing on the wall all over it since long : some friends of mine had two major incidents flying Concorde above the Atlantic (losing part of the rudder was the first, loss of power in one engine was another). Fantastic machine, poorly conceived maintenance. Piece of scrap metal here. Chunk of ice there. Totally avoidable. Think Challenger.
            Last edited by kantx; 07-18-13, 11:07 AM.

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            • #7
              Re: Bernanke:- We lost control

              Originally posted by kantx View Post
              Sound reasoning. Being the son of an ex-Air France captain myself, who's been first a fighter pilot, I know the older generation of flying officers regrets avionics comes at the expense of "fly with the pants" basics (exactly what allowed Sully to pull off the most fantastic safe crash of aviation history). My father and his friend captains used to say nowadays often ignore basic rules of gliding — plus some glitches in training due to Air France history in "return from experience".
              Tragically, Air France had one of the oldest and best flying tradition and partly squandered it, making for itself one of the worst accident record companies among the old majors.
              The Concorde crash had the writing on the wall all over it since long : some friends of mine had two major incidents flying Concorde above the Atlantic (losing part of the rudder was the first, loss of power in one engine was another). Fantastic machine, poorly conceived maintenance. Piece of scrap metal here. Chunk of ice there. Totally avoidable. Think Challenger.
              I do a great deal of international commercial flying (as a passenger), and I still have much more confidence in Air France than some other airlines...some of which I will not fly at all under any circumstance. I think each incident provides an opportunity to learn, and I notice since the Air France crash there is now much debate in the aviation community about re-emphasizing flight skills as some feel that modern commercial jet training curriculums are producing cockpit computer systems managers instead.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Bernanke:- We lost control

                Originally posted by GRG55 View Post
                I do a great deal of international commercial flying (as a passenger), and I still have much more confidence in Air France than some other airlines...some of which I will not fly at all under any circumstance. I think each incident provides an opportunity to learn, and I notice since the Air France crash there is now much debate in the aviation community about re-emphasizing flight skills as some feel that modern commercial jet training curriculums are producing cockpit computer systems managers instead.
                Yes, there's some repentance and amend here, and I heard training is now more back to the basics, like no engine flying, landing without instruments, etc.
                I just hope they ditched these damned Thales pitot tubes fitting the American ones instead, much less prone to icing.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Bernanke:- We lost control

                  Originally posted by kantx View Post
                  Yes, there's some repentance and amend here, and I heard training is now more back to the basics, like no engine flying, landing without instruments, etc.
                  I just hope they ditched these damned Thales pitot tubes fitting the American ones instead, much less prone to icing.
                  I believe they also connected the controls together.

                  So long as we are mixing airplanes and monetary policy, I'll offer the following analogy to describe the task ahead for Bernanke's replacement: Land a 787 at a particular airport starting 100 miles away without using any controls but only by turning the engines on an off. No misses and go-arounds allowed.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Bernanke:- We lost control

                    Originally posted by EJ View Post
                    I believe they also connected the controls together.

                    So long as we are mixing airplanes and monetary policy, I'll offer the following analogy to describe the task ahead for Bernanke's replacement: Land a 787 at a particular airport starting 100 miles away without using any controls but only by turning the engines on an off. No misses and go-arounds allowed.
                    With or without flaming batteries ?

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                    • #11
                      Re: Bernanke:- We lost control

                      Originally posted by kantx View Post
                      With or without flaming batteries ?
                      but do we get peanuts?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Bernanke:- We lost control

                        will you let me pump fuel from one wing tank to another to control bank?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Bernanke:- We lost control

                          Originally posted by charliebrown View Post
                          will you let me pump fuel from one wing tank to another to control bank?
                          no cheating!
                          he said 'no controls'
                          i'm hoping for peanuts and free drinks tho....

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                          • #14
                            Re: Bernanke:- We lost control

                            Originally posted by charliebrown View Post
                            will you let me pump fuel from one wing tank to another to control bank?
                            It's not that Yellen will not be allowed to use the controls, it's that there aren't any. There's just these two switches, one for each engine. Good luck!

                            p.s. If you smell smoke that's that's just the Li-ion batteries burning. Nothing to worry about. They are well contained.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Bernanke:- We lost control

                              Originally posted by EJ View Post
                              It's not that Yellen will not be allowed to use the controls, it's that there aren't any. There's just these two switches, one for each engine. Good luck!

                              p.s. If you smell smoke that's that's just the Li-ion batteries burning. Nothing to worry about. They are well contained.
                              ok - can we get some marshmellos to roast???

                              Comment

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