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  • WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange denied bail

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/...rticle1827668/
    WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange was refused bail by a London court on Tuesday after Sweden issued a warrant for his arrest over allegations of sex crimes.

    The 39-year-old Australian, who is at the centre of a row over the release of secret U.S. diplomatic cables, was arrested earlier on Tuesday by British police under a European Arrest Warrant after he appeared by appointment at a police station.

    Mr. Assange, who denies the allegations, was remanded in custody until December 14.

    Judge Howard Riddle told Mr. Assange that he had “substantial grounds” to believe he wouldn't turn up for subsequent proceedings. Judge Riddle then put Mr. Assange into U.K. custody ahead of an extradition hearing.

    Mr. Assange has been accused by two women in Sweden. He faces rape and sexual molestation allegations in one case and sexual molestation and unlawful coercion in the other. Mr. Assange denies the allegations.

    His British lawyer Mark Stephens says the allegations stem from a “dispute over consensual but unprotected sex” last summer.

    Swedish prosecutor Marianne Ny has rejected claims by Mr. Stephens and Mr. Assange that the prosecution has political overtones. She planned to comment on the arrest later Tuesday.

    Mr. Assange's Swedish lawyer Bjorn Hurtig said his client would contest any extradition.

    “He will absolutely do that,” he told The AP in a telephone interview.
    Mr. Hurtig said it was difficult to say how long the extradition process in Britain would take — anywhere from a week to two months. He said if Mr. Assange was extradited to Sweden, he wouldn't be kept in detention after he's been questioned, “because it's been for the sake of the questioning that he's been detained.”

    U.S. Defence Secretary Robert Gates, visiting Afghan President Hamid Karzai and U.S. troops in Afghanistan, was pleased by the arrest.

    “That sounds like good news to me,” he said.

    Beginning in July, WikiLeaks angered the U.S. government by releasing tens of thousands of secret U.S. military documents on the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. That was followed last week by the ongoing release of what WikiLeaks says will eventually be a quarter-million cables from U.S. diplomatic posts around the world. The group provided those documents to five major newspapers, which have been working with WikiLeaks to edit the cables for publication.

    In the past week, WikiLeaks has seen its bank accounts cancelled and its websites attacked. The U.S. government has launched a criminal investigation, saying the group has jeopardized U.S. national security and diplomatic efforts around the world.

    WikiLeaks has also seen an online army of supporters come to its aid, sending donations, fighting off computer attacks and setting up over 500 mirror sites around the world to make sure that the secret documents are published regardless of what happens to Assange.

    A spokesman for WikiLeaks called Mr. Assange's arrest an attack on media freedom and said it won't prevent the organization from releasing more secret documents.

    “This will not change our operation,” Kristinn Hrafnsson told The Associated Press.

    But Ms. Hrafnsson also said the group had no plans at the moment to release the key to a heavily encrypted version of some of its most important documents — an “insurance” file that has been distributed to supporters in case of an emergency. Ms. Hrafnsson said that will only come into play if “grave matters” involving WikiLeaks staff occur — but did not elaborate on what those would be.

    The campaign against WikiLeaks began with an effort to jam the website as the cables were being released. U.S. Internet companies Amazon.com, Inc., EveryDNS and PayPal, Inc. then severed their links with WikiLeaks in quick succession, forcing it to jump to new servers and adopt a new primary Web address — wikileaks.ch — in Switzerland.

    And on Tuesday, Visa suspended all payments to WikiLeaks pending an investigation of the organization's business.

    Visa's decision to pull the plug on WikiLeaks leaves the website with one fewer source of revenue.

    Swiss authorities have already closed Assange's new Swiss bank account, and MasterCard has pulled the plug on payments to WikiLeaks, according to technology news website CNET.

    The attacks appeared to have been at least partially successful in staunching the flow of secrets: WikiLeaks has not published any new cables in more than 24 hours, although stories about them have continued to appear in The New York Times and Britain's The Guardian, two of the newspapers given advance access to the cables.
    WikiLeaks' Twitter feed, generally packed with updates, appeals and pithy comments, has been silent since Monday night, when the group warned that Assange's arrest was imminent.

    With reports from Reuters
    Last edited by Slimprofits; 12-07-10, 10:37 AM.

  • #2
    Re: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange denied bail

    http://www.counterpunch.org/cockburn12032010.html
    Julian Assange: Wanted by the Empire, Dead or Alive

    By ALEXANDER COCKBURN

    This prime accuser, Anna Ardin has, according to Israel Shamir, writing on this CounterPunch site, "ties to the US-financed anti-Castro and anti-communist groups. She published her anti-Castro diatribes in the Swedish-language publication Revista de Asignaturas Cubanas put out by Misceláneas de Cuba…Note that Ardin was deported from Cuba for subversive activities."

    It's certainly not conspiracism to suspect that the CIA has been at work in fomenting these Swedish accusations. As Shamir reports, "The moment Julian sought the protection of Swedish media law, the CIA immediately threatened to discontinue intelligence sharing with SEPO, the Swedish Secret Service."

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange denied bail






      The New Normal at Work

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange denied bail

        Of course, those of you who would still like to access the Wikilieaks site can do so at:

        http://213.251.145.96/index.html

        Unfortunately, there seems to be too many folks out there in DNS land that wants the site to go away.

        Best of luck with that one...

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange denied bail

          Truth in Chains

          By CHRIS FLOYD
          London.
          Well, they got him at last. WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, the target of several of the world’s most powerful governments, turned himself into British authorities today and is now at the mercy of state authorities who have already shown their wolfish – and lawless – desire to destroy him and his organization.

          It has been, by any standard, an extraordinary campaign of vilification and persecution, wholly comparable to the kind of treatment doled out to dissidents in China or Burma. Lest we forget, WikiLeaks is a journalistic outlet – just like The New York Times, the Guardian and Der Spiegel, all of whom are even now publishing the very same material – leaked classified documents -- available on WikiLeaks. The website is also a journalistic outlet just like CNN, ABC, CBS, Fox and other mainstream media venues, where we have seen an endless parade of officials – and journalists! – calling for Assange to be prosecuted or killed outright. Every argument being made for shutting down WikiLeaks can – and doubtless will – be used against any journalistic enterprise that publishes material that powerful people do not like.

          And the leading role in this persecution of truth-telling is being played by the administration of the great progressive agent of hope and change, the self-proclaimed heir of Martin Luther King and Mahatma Gandhi, the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, Barack Obama. His attorney general, Eric Holder, is now making fierce noises about the “steps” he has already taken to bring down WikiLeaks and criminalize the leaking of embarrassing information. And listen to the ferocious reaction of that liberal lioness, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, who took to the pages of Rupert Murdoch’s Wall Street Journal to call for Assange to be put in prison – for 2,500,000 years:
          “When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange released his latest document trove—more than 250,000 secret State Department cables—he intentionally harmed the U.S. government. The release of these documents damages our national interests and puts innocent lives at risk. He should be vigorously prosecuted for espionage.

          “The law Mr. Assange continues to violate is the Espionage Act of 1917. That law makes it a felony for an unauthorized person to possess or transmit "information relating to the national defense which information the possessor has reason to believe could be used to the injury of the United States or to the advantage of any foreign nation." ...

          Importantly, the courts have held that "information relating to the national defense" applies to both classified and unclassified material. Each violation is punishable by up to 10 years in prison.”
          So there you have it. Ten years for each offense; 250,000 separate offenses; thus a prison term of 2.5 million years. Naturally, tomorrow the same newspaper will denounce Feinstein for being such a namby-pamby terrorist-coddling pinko: “Why didn’t she call for Assange to be torn from limb to limb by wild dogs, as any right-thinking red-blooded American would do!?”

          Meanwhile, corporate America and its international allies continue to do their bit. Joining PayPal and Amazon, who had already cut off their services to WikiLeaks, most of the remaining venues through which the internet journal is funded are also freezing out the organization -- MasterCard, Visa, and a Swiss bank that WikiLeaks used to process donations. All of these organizations are obviously responding to government pressure.

          What is perhaps most remarkable is that this joint action by the world elite to shut down WikiLeaks – which has been operating for four years – comes after the release of diplomatic cables, not in response to earlier leaks which provided detailed evidence of crimes and atrocities committed by the perpetrators and continuers of Washington’s Terror War. I suppose this is because the diplomatic cables have upset the smooth running of the corrupt and cynical backroom operations that actually govern our world, behind the ludicrous lies and self-righteous posturing that our great and good lay on for the public. They didn’t mind being unmasked as accomplices in mass murder and fomenters of suffering and hatred; in fact, they were rather proud of it. And they certainly knew that their fellow corruptocrats in foreign governments – not to mention the perpetually stunned and supine American people – wouldn’t give a toss about a bunch of worthless peons in Iraq and Afghanistan getting killed. But the diplomatic cables have caused an embarrassing stink among the closed little clique of the movers and shakers. And that is a crime deserving of vast eons in stir – or death.

          But before Assange was taken into custody, he fired off one last message to the world, in The Australian, a newspaper in his native land. With supreme irony, he tied WikiLeaks’ operation to the roots of the Murdoch media empire, which began by speaking truth to murderous and wasteful power – and now, of course, is one of the most powerful and assiduous instruments of murderous and wasteful power itself. Assange writes:
          “IN 1958 a young Rupert Murdoch, then owner and editor of Adelaide’s The News, wrote: “In the race between secrecy and truth, it seems inevitable that truth will always win.” His observation perhaps reflected his father Keith Murdoch’s expose that Australian troops were being needlessly sacrificed by incompetent British commanders on the shores of Gallipoli. The British tried to shut him up but Keith Murdoch would not be silenced and his efforts led to the termination of the disastrous Gallipoli campaign.

          “Nearly a century later, WikiLeaks is also fearlessly publishing facts that need to be made public. … Democratic societies need a strong media and WikiLeaks is part of that media. The media helps keep government honest. WikiLeaks has revealed some hard truths about the Iraq and Afghan wars, and broken stories about corporate corruption.

          “WikiLeaks is not the only publisher of the US embassy cables. Other media outlets, including Britain ‘s The Guardian, The New York Times, El Pais in Spain and Der Spiegel in Germany have published the same redacted cables.

          “Yet it is WikiLeaks, as the co-ordinator of these other groups, that has copped the most vicious attacks and accusations from the US government and its acolytes. I have been accused of treason, even though I am an Australian, not a US citizen. There have been dozens of serious calls in the US for me to be “taken out” by US Special Forces. Sarah Palin says I should be “hunted down like Osama bin Laden”, a Republican bill sits before the US Senate seeking to have me declared a “transnational threat” and disposed of accordingly. An adviser to the Canadian Prime Minister’s office has called on national television for me to be assassinated. An American blogger has called for my 20-year-old son, here in Australia, to be kidnapped and harmed for no other reason than to get at me.”
          These, of course, are the defenders of Western Civilization, that pinnacle of human progress, that bulwark against savagery like murder and torture, that bastion of temperance and reason. But in his piece, Assange once more gives the lie to the ferocious canards of Feinstein, Holder, Obama and Palin about the “great harm” the leaks have done:
          “WikiLeaks has a four-year publishing history. During that time we have changed whole governments, but not a single person, as far as anyone is aware, has been harmed. But the US, with Australian government connivance, has killed thousands in the past few months alone.

          “US Secretary of Defence Robert Gates admitted in a letter to the US congress that no sensitive intelligence sources or methods had been compromised by the Afghan war logs disclosure. The Pentagon stated there was no evidence the WikiLeaks reports had led to anyone being harmed in Afghanistan. NATO in Kabul told CNN it couldn’t find a single person who needed protecting. The Australian Department of Defence said the same. No Australian troops or sources have been hurt by anything we have published.”
          Yes, how many thousands of people, how many tens of thousands, have been killed by our bipartisan Terror Warriors in the four years of WikiLeaks’ existence? How many millions have been “harmed” not only by the direct operations of the Terror War, but by the ever-widening, ever-deepening violence, hatred and turmoil it is spreading throughout the world? (Not to mention the accelerating collapse of American society, which has been financially, politically and morally bankrupted by the acceptance of aggressive war, torture, elite rapine and authoritarian rule.)

          But none of the perpetrators of these acts, past or present, are in jail, or have even been prosecuted, or investigated, or inconvenienced in any way. Yet Assange is in a British prison tonight – and it is certainly not for the “sexual misconduct” charges that were filed against him in August, which then became the basis of an unprecedented worldwide arrest order of the type ordinarily reserved for war criminals – for those, in fact, accused of aggressive war, torture, elite rapine and authoritarian rule. The judge refused to grant bail, saying that Assange had “access to financial means” and could flee the country – perhaps a bitter joke on milord’s part, aimed at a man whose means of financial support are being systematically shut down by the most powerful government and corporate forces in the world. Journalist John Pilger and filmmaker Ken Loach were among those who appeared in court ready to stand surety for Assange, but to no avail.

          WikiLeaks will doubtless try to struggle on. And Assange says he has given the entire diplomatic trove to 100,000 people. By dribs and drabs, shards of truth will get out. But the world’s journalists – and those persons of conscience working in the world’s governments – have been given a hard, harsh, unmistakable lesson in the new realities of our degraded time. Tell a truth that discomforts power, that challenges its domination over our lives, our discourse, our very thoughts, and you will be destroyed. No institution, public or private, will stand with you; the most powerful entities, public and private, will be arrayed against you, backed up by overwhelming violent force. This is where we are now. This is what we are now.

          http://www.counterpunch.org/floyd12072010.html

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange denied bail

            nice piece, rings very true. I'm just about a fully fledged anarchist by now.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange denied bail

              As I said before:

              If he indeed is prosecuted and convicted in Sweden if he gets anything more than 6 months to 1 year in jail then that will be the 100% proof anyone needs to know the Swedes are doing the US and world governments a favor.

              Even serial rapist dont get more than 1-2 years of jail time in sweden...

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange denied bail

                “IN 1958 a young Rupert Murdoch, then owner and editor of Adelaide’s The News, wrote: “In the race between secrecy and truth, it seems inevitable that truth will always win.” His observation perhaps reflected his father Keith Murdoch’s expose that Australian troops were being needlessly sacrificed by incompetent British commanders on the shores of Gallipoli. The British tried to shut him up but Keith Murdoch would not be silenced and his efforts led to the termination of the disastrous Gallipoli campaign.
                That is truly a sweet bit of irony. Great piece.

                The thing that snapped all of this into focus for me was an interview with the above-mentioned John Pilger on BBC yesterday morning (see Dec. 7 post):

                http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/worldupmc

                His point was, given the fact that we've been recently hoodwinked into a war under false pretenses and have slid into the abyss of torture, extrajudicial courts and prisons all under the gaze of "journalists" who often colluded with governments in the above without losing their credibility, the success of Wikileaks represents the shame of contemporary journalism.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange denied bail

                  Originally posted by bcassill View Post
                  Of course, those of you who would still like to access the Wikilieaks site can do so at:

                  http://213.251.145.96/index.html

                  Unfortunately, there seems to be too many folks out there in DNS land that wants the site to go away.

                  Best of luck with that one...
                  Easier with:

                  http://wikileaks.ch/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange denied bail

                    Originally posted by tsetsefly View Post
                    As I said before:

                    If he indeed is prosecuted and convicted in Sweden if he gets anything more than 6 months to 1 year in jail then that will be the 100% proof anyone needs to know the Swedes are doing the US and world governments a favor.

                    Even serial rapist dont get more than 1-2 years of jail time in sweden...
                    Won't be necessary to keep him long at all. He is going to suffer an "accidental suicide"... slipping on a bar of soap in the shower, then accidentally cutting his throat with a razor blade while shaving, followed by hanging himself with a towel. Either that or a heart attack.

                    Or maybe he'll recant all his misdeeds and get religion!

                    Be kinder than necessary because everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange denied bail

                      Daniel Elsberg chimes in:

                      http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/blogs/...entry_id=78596

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange denied bail

                        Yeah, there's nothing about Israel or Israel's relationship with the US in these cables....nothing at all....

                        http://mondoweiss.net/2010/12/the-sm...-must-end.html

                        http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/a9d40808-0...#axzz18rcnl14q

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange denied bail

                          After Freeze, Settlement Building Booms in Israel

                          By ETHAN BRONNER 12:13 PM ET

                          In the three months since Israel ended its freeze, construction is booming in places that are least likely to be part of Israel after any two-state peace deal. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/23/wo...settle.html?hp
                          Smooth.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange denied bail

                            Originally posted by babbittd View Post
                            Yeah, there's nothing about Israel or Israel's relationship with the US in these cables....nothing at all....
                            Sure, Israel has had a few cameo appearances, but nothing seriously damaging to it.
                            Most folks are good; a few aren't.

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