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By Roger Ebert: If this man is correct, you may be reading the most important story in today's paper

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  • By Roger Ebert: If this man is correct, you may be reading the most important story in today's paper

    COLLAPSE

    BY ROGER EBERT / December 9, 2009
    Rating: 4 Stars (4 is the highest rating) - Running time: 82 minutes.

    If this man is correct, then you may be reading the most important story in today's paper.

    I have no way of assuring you that the bleak version of the future outlined by Michael Ruppert in Chris Smith's "Collapse" is accurate. I can only tell you I have a pretty good built-in B.S. detector, and its needle never bounced off zero while I watched this film. There is controversy over Ruppert, and he has many critics. But one simple fact at the center of his argument is obviously true, and it terrifies me.

    That fact: We have passed the peak of global oil resources. There are only so many known oil reserves. We have used up more than half of them. Remaining reserves are growing smaller, and the demand is growing larger. It took about a century to use up the first half. That usage was much accelerated in the most recent 50 years. Now the oil demands of giant economies like India and China are exploding. They represent more than half the global population, and until recent decades had small energy consumption.

    If the supply is finite, and usage is potentially doubling, you do the math. We will face a global oil crisis, not in the distant future, but within the lives of many now alive. They may well see a world without significant oil.

    Oh, I grow so impatient with those who prattle about our untapped resources in Alaska, yada yada yada. There seems to be only enough oil in Alaska to power the United States for a matter of months. The world's great oil reserves have been discovered.

    Saudi Arabia sits atop the largest oil reservoir ever found. For years, the Saudis have refused to disclose any figures at all about their reserves. If those reserves are vast and easy to tap by drilling straight down through the desert, then ask yourself this question: Why are the Saudis spending billions of dollars to develop offshore drilling platforms?

    Ruppert is a man ordinary in appearance, on the downhill slope of middle age, a chain smoker with a mustache. He is not all worked up. He speaks reasonably and very clearly. "Collapse" involves what he has to say, illustrated with news footage and a few charts, the most striking of which is a bell-shaped curve. It takes a lot of effort to climb a bell-shaped curve, but the descent is steep and dangerous.

    He recites facts I knew, vaguely. Many things are made from oil. Everything plastic. Paint. There are eight gallons of oil in every auto tire. Oil supplies the energy to convert itself into those byproducts. No oil, no plastic, no tires, no gas to run cars, no machines to build them. No coal mines, except those operated by men and horses.

    Alternative energies and conservation? The problem is the cost of obtaining and using it. Ethanol requires more energy than it produces. Hybrid and battery cars need engines, tires and batteries. Nuclear power plants need to be built with oil. Electricity from wind power is most useful near its source. It is transmitted by grids built and maintained by oil. Wave power is expensive to collect. Solar power is cheap and limitless, but we need a whole hell of a lot more solar panels and other collecting devices.

    Like I say, you do the math. Ruppert has done his math, and he concludes that our goose is cooked. He doesn't have any answers. We're passing the point of diminishing returns on the way to our rendezvous with the point of no return. It was nice while it lasted. People lived happily enough in the centuries before oil, electricity and steam, I guess. Of course, there were fewer than 6 billion of us. In this century, Ruppert says, there will be a lot fewer than 6 billion again. It won't be a pretty sight.

    I'm not going to mention his theories about global warming, because that's a subject that inflames too many zealots. About peak oil, his reasoning is clear, simple and hard to refute.

    So you can stop reading now. That's the heart of Ruppert's message, delivered by a calm guy who could be Wilford Brimley's kid brother, lives alone with his dog and is behind on his rent.

    I was fascinated by some of the directions peak oil takes him into. For him, he says, it was the key to understanding many seemingly unconnected geopolitical events. The facts he outlines are known to world leaders, who don't talk a lot about them in alarmist terms, but they explain why Bush/Cheney were happy to have an excuse to invade Iraq. And why our embassy compound in Baghdad is the largest we've ever built, larger than Vatican City. And why we're so much more worried by Iran than North Korea. They may also explain Obama's perplexing decision to increase troops in Afghanistan. An undeclared world war for oil is already under way.

    I don't know when I've seen a thriller more frightening. I couldn't tear my eyes from the screen. "Collapse" is even entertaining, in a macabre sense. I think you owe it to yourself to see it.

    Vitagraph Films presents a documentary directed by Chris Smith. Featuring Michael Ruppert. Running time: 82 minutes. No MPAA rating.

    Note: Through local cable providers, "Collapse" is available now via on demand. Check local listings and movies on demand channels.

    http://onebigtorrent.org/torrents/75...-Collapse-2009

    http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/...IEWS/912099993

  • #2
    Re: By Roger Ebert: If this man is correct, you may be reading the most important story in today's p

    Two articles for your reading pleasure :eek:

    Civilization's Demographic Journey (pdf)

    Demographically speaking, where are we now? Late in 1999, for the first time ever, world population reached six billion and we now find ourselves nearing seven billion. What milestones brought us to this point? And where is our momentum taking us? In this excerpt we trace major milestones in humanity's demographic journey over the past ten thousand years.
    Thresholds, Tipping Points, and Unintended Consequences (pdf)

    Imagine the first domino in a row of adjacent dominos being toppled, thereby causing all the others to fall in quick succession. In such an event, even an accidental instability imparted to a single domino can unexpectedly topple a far wider and interconnected system. We are living at a time when each of humanity’s added billions is impacting one natural system after another, incrementally, and in most cases, repeatedly – again, and again, and again. And a disconcerting amount of accumulating evidence suggests that some of earth’s most important dominos may already be toppling. In these excerpts from Wecskaop chapter thirteen we will consider thresholds, tipping points, and unintended consequences.
    And also What Every Citizen Should Know About Our Planet

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    • #3
      Re: By Roger Ebert: If this man is correct, you may be reading the most important story in today's p

      http://economicedge.blogspot.com/200...-bartlett.html
      the above from nathan .a. martin's blog having the 4 series video from dr. bartlett is worth viewing for every one
      , the above link is not working- view it in economicedge dot blogspot dot com-spend some time with good dr bartlett
      Last edited by samy; 12-30-09, 07:57 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: By Roger Ebert: If this man is correct, you may be reading the most important story in today's p
        Quote:

        No oil, no plastic, no tires, no gas to run cars, no machines to build them. No coal mines, except those operated by men and horses.

        Yeah . . . we're all going to have to become Amish . . . whether we like it or not :eek:
        raja
        Boycott Big Banks • Vote Out Incumbents

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: By Roger Ebert: If this man is correct, you may be reading the most important story in today's p

          Originally posted by raja View Post
          Quote:

          No oil, no plastic, no tires, no gas to run cars, no machines to build them. No coal mines, except those operated by men and horses.

          Yeah . . . we're all going to have to become Amish . . . whether we like it or not :eek:
          Amish with Internet, hopefully!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: By Roger Ebert: If this man is correct, you may be reading the most important story in today's p

            Originally posted by jtabeb View Post
            Amish with Internet, hopefully!
            But as we all know the internet is "a series of tubes" and those tubes are probably plastic.... so I guess we're SOL once again! ;)

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: By Roger Ebert: If this man is correct, you may be reading the most important story in today's p

              Samy here is a good link to watch Dr. Bartlett's video - The Most IMPORTANT Video You'll Ever See

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: By Roger Ebert: If this man is correct, you may be reading the most important story in today's p

                thanks rajiv for quoting the link of the video

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: By Roger Ebert: If this man is correct, you may be reading the most important story in today's p

                  Originally posted by Rajiv View Post
                  Samy here is a good link to watch Dr. Bartlett's video - The Most IMPORTANT Video You'll Ever See

                  What scares me most is that this fellow is a college professor and foists his socio-politcial view on his impressionable students ... Malthusian nonsense. He has an annoying tendency to convey facts and mathematics which make him credible, but then goes on to insinuate his gospel the need for population control, blah blah blah - quoting and miscontruing great thinkers to support his culture of death view - shame shame shame


                  No wonder we have a bunch of 20-30 somethings who subscribe to all this nonsense

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: By Roger Ebert: If this man is correct, you may be reading the most important story in today's p

                    Except hes got facts backing him up so its not nonsense. The drastic "solutions" he brings up are due to the dire situation we find ourselves in, which is due to not taking steps to address the energy issue decades ago.

                    Its ugly, but without the necessary new sources of energy, population control is one of the few "easy" ways to reduce our energy consumption... The alternative is to let people just continue to have kids until we get famine and drought issues, that is if our infrastructure doesn't start to collapse first.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: By Roger Ebert: If this man is correct, you may be reading the most important story in today's p

                      Originally posted by jtabeb View Post
                      Amish with Internet, hopefully!
                      Being "eAmish" might not be that bad. Maybe we could update the wardrobe a bit, though.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: By Roger Ebert: If this man is correct, you may be reading the most important story in today's p

                        Originally posted by Rajiv View Post
                        http://rsta.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/365/1856/1657.full
                        Last edited by dcarrigg; 12-30-09, 12:18 PM. Reason: wrong link

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: By Roger Ebert: If this man is correct, you may be reading the most important story in today's p

                          Originally posted by vinoveri View Post
                          What scares me most is that this fellow is a college professor and foists his socio-politcial view on his impressionable students ... Malthusian nonsense. He has an annoying tendency to convey facts and mathematics which make him credible, but then goes on to insinuate his gospel the need for population control, blah blah blah - quoting and miscontruing great thinkers to support his culture of death view - shame shame shame


                          No wonder we have a bunch of 20-30 somethings who subscribe to all this nonsense
                          Without a miraculous discovery, hundreds of millions, if not billions, will die in the next century. If we did not have nuclear weapons or had a good way to defend against them, I would love to have a massive world war that would wipe out the pudgy, overindulged masses on this planet. But, the reality of the situation is that we can have population controls, nuclear war, famine, or disease.

                          There are no other solutions.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: By Roger Ebert: If this man is correct, you may be reading the most important story in today's p

                            Originally posted by jimmygu3 View Post
                            Being "eAmish" might not be that bad. Maybe we could update the wardrobe a bit, though.
                            Hey this is going to sound funny but I think going back to a little more of an amish way of life might not be a bad thing. I find myself spending way too much time at the comp (I don't watch TV) and the kids way to much time with video games and on the TV.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: By Roger Ebert: If this man is correct, you may be reading the most important story in today's p

                              Originally posted by vinoveri View Post
                              What scares me most is that this fellow is a college professor and foists his socio-politcial view on his impressionable students ... Malthusian nonsense. He has an annoying tendency to convey facts and mathematics which make him credible, but then goes on to insinuate his gospel the need for population control, blah blah blah - quoting and miscontruing great thinkers to support his culture of death view - shame shame shame


                              No wonder we have a bunch of 20-30 somethings who subscribe to all this nonsense
                              Could you explain more please? Your viewpoints is very interesting to me. What is being misconstrued? What is the nonsense that you see? Is it the premise, or the conclusion, or something else?

                              Comment

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