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A Modest Proposal: New sources of tax revenue in an economic depression

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  • #16
    Re: A Modest Proposal: New sources of tax revenue in an economic depression

    Originally posted by ASH View Post
    Perhaps Fred should have provided a link to Jonathan Swift's Essay, rather than trusting to the education system. Plus, iTulip has an international readership, and although iTulip is an English language publication, it may be that "A Modest Proposal" is not required reading everywhere that English is spoken.

    Good idea.
    Ed.

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    • #17
      Re: A Modest Proposal: New sources of tax revenue in an economic depression

      Originally posted by Jim Nickerson View Post
      If a woman doesn't want an abortion or thinks there is something "sinful" with aborting early stage fetuses, then she certainly should not have one, and the same for whatever are the implications regarding stem-cell research. If technics evolve that will improve the quality of some afflicted persons' lives and one's morality prevents him/or her from subjecting themselves or their children to such therapy, such objectors are certainly free not to avail themselves of such treatment.

      As far as the government at all levels, I guess it is at all levels, subsidizing any religions with tax breaks, it strikes me as pure bunk and failure to separate state and religion as I see it. As long as religions are free to use their pulpits to interfere with elections, they should not be given tax breaks.

      Actually, I am 1000% for freedom of religion as long as it is practiced by a single individual within the privacy of his/her own closet; otherwise I see more bad to it than good.
      Hey Jim, thanks for clarifying. I'm live and let live for the most part, but I see things the other way; Christianity and other organized religions are not the threat to my freedom as I can join or leave them. It is modern secularism that I would rather stay in the closet and leave me be. Religions don't control the government, but secular causes sure can get legislation passed or more likely court rulings that overturn majorities.

      We live in a pluralistic society where the market place of ideas should, IMO, be the place where everything is fair game for discussion, and argument. You being supportive of religion as long as it is practiced in one's closet is the way I sometimes feel (and wish) of those converts to modernsim and other secular "causes" who continue to succeed in getting government to listen and alter society based on their faddish ideas. The sad fact is too many people want to "save the world" or "rule the world" and they are convinced they are right no less than any religious nutter.

      Let everyone have their say and let the chips fall where they may - this is not what is going on, though, instead small, well organized and well funded groups lobby the government, infect higher education and teach lies to the next generation - and there's no open debate anymore on campus - ever heard of political correctness, alive and thriving. They don't have the truth, and they are afraid of the truth and those who want to spread it, so they exclude it from curriculuum and ridicule and keep out those with differing view points.

      I trust the common man on fundamental common sense questions of human existence, much more than any experts. The common man is simply duped, and the reason PC thought and disapprobation is so rampant is that the Truth, the common sense, is still there in the collective subconscience, just under the surface, and these experts know that and they must stamp out anything that would set men and women free. The goal of higher education should be to teach how to think critically, identifying the axioms and first assumptions and premises, assessing them, and judging the validity and truth or any conclusions. This is not what is going on. The previous generation and current ones are being taught what to think not how to think. Liberty has been transformed into Libertine.

      Perhaps organized religion in cahoots with the governmental authorities in west in centuries gone by could be fairly seen as holding a burdensome yolk.
      The largest religion in the world, the Catholic church, has no power over anyone, it has no mechanisms of enforcement, via taxation, fining, imprisonments and the like. It is only governments with police power that can compel individuals to act or consent with policies ...and more an more of these policies are being formed and driven by post modern assaults on the common sense of the ages. It is the dogmas being taught today that are the threat to individual liberty - take the global warming farce for instance as the latest example.

      With regard to your 1st paragraph above, please consider that the woman who is struggling to decide whether to keep her baby or destroy it will only hear one call for action if your desire represented in your 3rd paragraph is enforced, i.e., if the folks who think that man killing his unborn is not only inhumane but inhuman et cet, has to stay in his closet, and can't speak in order to reach the common sense conscience of the women, what kind of fairness is this?


      On taxes, the less the gov takes from all of the us, the better. I believe any 501c org can get tax exempt status, and although I don't know the requirements, I would suspect that their are many many more tax exempt non-religious org than religious, but am certainly welcome to be shown that this is not the case.

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      • #18
        Re: A Modest Proposal: New sources of tax revenue in an economic depression

        well the chinese government are trying to stop their corrupt people from giving all their cash to foreign casinos. It just keeps on getting worse for poor old james packer.

        http://business.smh.com.au/business/...0119-7ktm.html

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        • #19
          Re: A Modest Proposal: New sources of tax revenue in an economic depression

          Originally posted by vinoveri View Post
          It is modern secularism that I would rather stay in the closet and leave me be.
          Sometimes it seems to me that modern secularism shares a trait with Islam, in that some strains of both seem to view the state as an extension of their religion, rather than as a voluntary, limited association of free people.

          I happen to be an atheist, but it offends me when secularists try to remove religion from the public square. The so called "separation of church and state" tenant has become little better than a justification for bigotry, against fundamentalist Christians in particular.

          I would go even further, and claim that the roots of this great nation are deeply based in Christianity, and that such was essential, not incidental. The right to religious freedom is the right to practice ones faith, not some right to be insulated from the faith of others.

          Public displays of religious faith by others do not threaten my freedom. Public disdain of others religious expression does threaten my freedom.
          Most folks are good; a few aren't.

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          • #20
            Re: A Modest Proposal: New sources of tax revenue in an economic depression

            You guys are amazingly prescient....even when being ironic...

            Strip club opens in Henley

            Residents of the polite Oxfordshire town of Henley-on-Thames are in uproar over plans to open its first strip club.

            Diamonds and Pearls, a venue promising lapdancing and "fun", is set to open this weekend in a building once used for ballroom dancing opposite a day centre for the elderly.

            ...........

            But opponents say they are powerless to stop the club opening because of licensing laws which class lapdancing venues alongside pubs and cafes.
            The local licensing authority, South Oxfordshire District Council, said it had no choice but to grant a licence for the venue, including permission for "adult entertainment" as the building, a former nightclub, had previously held a late night entertainment licence. But members of the town council, including Gill Zakss, the mayor, insist the venue is not suitable for Henley.

            .............

            But the owner Manowar Hussain, a businessman from nearby Maidenhead, Berks, dismissed the fears and said the club would make a positive contribution to the town.

            "We are not here to wreck people's lives, we are here to provide entertainment and a bit of fun and give something back to the town," he said.
            "We are not going to have ladies standing outside. It is not immoral, it is a business venture."

            Andy Mags, the manager, added: "Yes, it will have strippers and lapdancers but it will provide a place for people to come and meet, for businessmen to entertain their clients.

            ....etc etc
            [/B]

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            • #21
              Re: A Modest Proposal: New sources of tax revenue in an economic depression

              Originally posted by ThePythonicCow View Post
              Sometimes it seems to me that modern secularism shares a trait with Islam, in that some strains of both seem to view the state as an extension of their religion, rather than as a voluntary, limited association of free people.

              I happen to be an atheist, but it offends me when secularists try to remove religion from the public square. The so called "separation of church and state" tenant has become little better than a justification for bigotry, against fundamentalist Christians in particular.

              I would go even further, and claim that the roots of this great nation are deeply based in Christianity, and that such was essential, not incidental. The right to religious freedom is the right to practice ones faith, not some right to be insulated from the faith of others.

              Public displays of religious faith by others do not threaten my freedom. Public disdain of others religious expression does threaten my freedom.
              On the other hand it would be impossible for a self-declared humanist or aetheist to attain any elected office of any power. A local school board perhaps. Homosexuals, all races, both sexes ... all can successfully run for office (thank goodness) but aetheists cannot.

              Both sides have to look past their prejudices.

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: A Modest Proposal: New sources of tax revenue in an economic depression

                Originally posted by Chris View Post
                You guys are amazingly prescient....even when being ironic...
                Strip club opens in Henley

                Residents of the polite Oxfordshire town of Henley-on-Thames are in uproar over plans to open its first strip club.

                Diamonds and Pearls, a venue promising lapdancing and "fun", is set to open this weekend...
                Wow. That'll be quite a change for Henley-on-Thames.

                From a requirement that hemlines must be below the knees [Regatta Steward's enclosure rules - strictly enforced from my observations a few years back]...

                ...to no hemlines at all. :eek:

                The gin and Jaguar set must be having heart palpitations.
                "...Women cannot wear dresses above the knee or trousers or culottes; men cannot remove their jackets and ties unless it reaches 80 degrees in the shade, the boiling point at which the stewards will make a formal announcement that coats may be shed...

                ...Women are allowed to row in the Henley regatta this year [1993] for the first time in its 154-year history, but there has been no relaxing of the rules on the fashion front. During the week, women wearing short skirts will show up, just to make a statement and get on the evening news, but they will be turned away; Henley is a very carefully cultivated time warp. Stewards have become adept at catching those women who try the "Groucho Marx," as it is known here, a bowed, slump-shouldered walk that some use to give the impression their hemlines are a couple of inches longer.

                "Everyone writes about the women we throw out, but we throw out gentlemen without jackets, too," said Michael Sweeney, a waterworks official from Nottingham and onetime oarsman for Cambridge who is the new Henley chairman. "Every year, we get pressure from half a dozen members who complain that their guests were not allowed in because of their dress. But we get more letters from members saying: 'For heaven's sake, preserve the tradition. Don't let us become like Ascot and Wimbledon.' :p ..."
                btw, if anybody has any money left after this catastrophe finally ends, and you're looking for something truly elegant upon which spend it [remember, ya can't take it with you] there may be some good deals on one of these:






                Bow detail of the beautiful woodwork of a slipper launch moored at Henley-on-Thames, River Thames, Oxfordshire.

                'Slipper launches' are so named because of their graceful sterns and low profiles which give an overall impression of a lady's slipper. Traditionally they display beautiful, highly varnished, and often richly contrasting, exotic woods such as teak, mahogany and obeche.

                Last edited by GRG55; 01-21-09, 09:04 AM.

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