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The Latest in Junk Economics: Marginalist Panaceas to Today’s Structural Problems -- Michael Hudson

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  • #91
    Re: The Latest in Junk Economics: Marginalist Panaceas to Today’s Structural Problems -- Michael Hud

    bubba, if you can't differentiate between architecture and circumstance - I'm no longer going to waste time trying to demonstrate.

    May your fantasy of Libertarian America Uber Alles continue.

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    • #92
      Re: The Latest in Junk Economics: Marginalist Panaceas to Today’s Structural Problems -- Michael Hud

      Originally posted by c1ue View Post
      bubba, if you can't differentiate between architecture and circumstance - I'm no longer going to waste time trying to demonstrate.

      May your fantasy of Libertarian America Uber Alles continue.
      Bubba, your posts in this thread are a tribute to logical fallacies. Thank you for not wasting any more of my time.

      Comment


      • #93
        Re: The Latest in Junk Economics: Marginalist Panaceas to Today’s Structural Problems -- Michael Hud

        Originally posted by Mashuri View Post
        Has any other nation ever formed around even similar concepts? The answer is "no" which makes it unique.
        wikipedia on constitutions

        Excavations in modern-day Iraq by Ernest de Sarzec in 1877 found evidence of the earliest known code of justice, issued by the Sumerian king Urukagina of Lagash ca 2300 BC. Perhaps the earliest prototype for a law of government, this document itself has not yet been discovered; however it is known that it allowed some rights to his citizens. For example, it is known that it relieved tax for widows and orphans, and protected the poor from the usury of the rich.
        The Romans first codified their constitution in 449 BC as the Twelve Tables. They operated under a series of laws that were added from time to time, but Roman law was never reorganised into a single code until the Codex Theodosianus (AD 438); later, in the Eastern Empire the Codex repetitæ prælectionis (534) was highly influential throughout Europe. This was followed in the east by the Ecloga of Leo III the Isaurian (740) and the Basilica of Basil I (878).
        Japan's Seventeen-article constitution written in 604, reportedly by Prince Shōtoku, is an early example of a constitution in Asian political history. Influenced by Buddhist teachings, the document focuses more on social morality than institutions of government per se and remains a notable early attempt at a government constitution. Another is the Constitution of Medina, drafted by the prophet of Islam, Muhammad, in 622. It is said to be one of the earliest constitutions which guarantees basic rights to religions and adherents as well as reinforcing a judiciary process regarding the rules of warfare, tax and civil disputes.
        In England, Henry I's proclamation of the Charter of Liberties in 1100 bound the king for the first time in his treatment of the clergy and the nobility. This idea was extended and refined by the English barony when they forced King John to sign Magna Carta in 1215. The most important single article of the Magna Carta, related to "habeas corpus", provided that the king was not permitted to imprison, outlaw, exile or kill anyone at a whim — there must be due process of law first. This article, Article 39, of the Magna Carta read:
        No free man shall be arrested, or imprisoned, or deprived of his property, or outlawed, or exiled, or in any way destroyed, nor shall we go against him or send against him, unless by legal judgement of his peers, or by the law of the land.
        It's Economics vs Thermodynamics. Thermodynamics wins.

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        • #94
          Re: The Latest in Junk Economics: Marginalist Panaceas to Today’s Structural Problems -- Michael Hud

          Originally posted by *T* View Post
          It's like people are trying to win an argument on irrelevant technicalities. I never said that Constitutions granting people some rights never existed before, just that the Bill of Rights, in particular, was a radical departure that set an unprecedented relationship between a government and its people. The U.S. was a new experiment in governance -- one that, in my opinion, is due for a "re-boot" using what we've learned from the past 200 years.

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          • #95
            Re: The Latest in Junk Economics: Marginalist Panaceas to Today’s Structural Problems -- Michael Hud

            T,

            Good of you to post some counterexamples, but it is a waste of time to break through Mashuri's fanatic belief in American exceptionalism.

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            • #96
              Re: The Latest in Junk Economics: Marginalist Panaceas to Today’s Structural Problems -- Michael Hud

              Originally posted by c1ue View Post
              T,

              Good of you to post some counterexamples, but it is a waste of time to break through Mashuri's fanatic belief in American exceptionalism.
              So much for "not wasting your time". How much further would you like to draw out this tangent? How relevant is this to the original point? Finally, does our relentless nitpicking here on minutiae count as a thread-jack?

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              • #97
                Re: The Latest in Junk Economics: Marginalist Panaceas to Today’s Structural Problems -- Michael Hud

                Originally posted by Mashuri View Post
                So much for "not wasting your time". How much further would you like to draw out this tangent? How relevant is this to the original point? Finally, does our relentless nitpicking here on minutiae count as a thread-jack?
                Let me phrase this another way, just to be thorough. Whether or not the Bill of Rights is radical and unique (a subjective call, anyway) how is that relevant to the original public / private property debate?

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                • #98
                  Re: The Latest in Junk Economics: Marginalist Panaceas to Today’s Structural Problems -- Michael Hud

                  Originally posted by Mashuri View Post
                  Let me phrase this another way, just to be thorough. Whether or not the Bill of Rights is radical and unique (a subjective call, anyway) how is that relevant to the original public / private property debate?
                  You tell us please.

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    Re: The Latest in Junk Economics: Marginalist Panaceas to Today’s Structural Problems -- Michael Hud

                    Originally posted by Chris Coles View Post
                    You tell us please.
                    Thought it was hinted at enough. Answer: None. Let's kill the tangent.

                    Comment


                    • Re: The Latest in Junk Economics: Marginalist Panaceas to Today’s Structural Problems -- Michael Hud

                      Originally posted by Mashuri View Post
                      Let's kill the tangent.
                      ... and the silent lurkers throw a party to celebrate its death

                      Most folks are good; a few aren't.

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