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The Myth of the Slow Crash

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  • Verrocchio
    replied
    Re: The Myth of the Slow Crash

    [quote=Chris Coles;25680][quote=Verrocchio;25676]Ah, but if you were talking about gold coins of less than an ounce, I think about three wheelbarrows of Weimar Republic German 10 million mark Reichsbanknotes should be fair. Fair?

    But the illustration is for a 100 million mark note, so if you are saying the deal is for three wheelbarrows of the illustrated notes, then that is ten times the offer......!!! Mint condition mind you, not like some of the worn out notes that I have seen in the past.
    Well, you've caught me out now. The actual offer was 3 barrows of 10 million mark notes, and the illustration was just a bit of flash to lure him into the deal. If he misunderstood the deal, well... caveat emptor! ;)

    Leave a comment:


  • c1ue
    replied
    Re: The Myth of the Slow Crash

    Originally posted by Verrocchio
    Ah, but if you were talking about gold coins of less than an ounce, I think about three wheelbarrows of Weimar Republic German 10 million mark Reichsbanknotes should be fair. Fair?
    Sorry, I'm in the business of selling FAST kits, not currency exchange.

    Dollars only - limited time offer ;)

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris Coles
    replied
    Re: The Myth of the Slow Crash

    [quote=Verrocchio;25676]Ah, but if you were talking about gold coins of less than an ounce, I think about three wheelbarrows of Weimar Republic German 10 million mark Reichsbanknotes should be fair. Fair?[quote]

    But the illustration is for a 100 million mark note, so if you are saying the deal is for three wheelbarrows of the illustrated notes, then that is ten times the offer......!!! Mint condition mind you, not like some of the worn out notes that I have seen in the past.

    Leave a comment:


  • Verrocchio
    replied
    Re: The Myth of the Slow Crash

    Originally posted by c1ue View Post
    Sure.

    How would you like to pay?
    Ah, but if you were talking about gold coins of less than an ounce, I think about three wheelbarrows of Weimar Republic German 10 million mark Reichsbanknotes should be fair. Fair?
    [IMG]file:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/J/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/moz-screenshot-1.jpg[/IMG]

    Leave a comment:


  • c1ue
    replied
    Re: The Myth of the Slow Crash

    Originally posted by Chris Coles
    With the greatest of respects, with no salt, you would not last the first winter. You need to read "The River Cottage Meat Book" by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall.
    Actually I had included it in the 30 pounds of spices.

    True, for the long term you probably need more than the 20 pounds of salt there, but on the other hand transportability is a factor...

    Leave a comment:


  • c1ue
    replied
    Re: The Myth of the Slow Crash

    Originally posted by Verrocchio
    Hmm, the kit includes 1000 gold coins and the other goodies, too? And for only $500k? I'll take your entire inventory.;)
    Sure.

    How would you like to pay?

    Note I never said WHICH gold coins, or what size they were...


    2006

    1/20th ounce

    CANADIAN Maple Leaf small gold coin

    Nice Uncirculated condition

    *** Special ***

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris Coles
    replied
    Re: The Myth of the Slow Crash

    With the greatest of respects, with no salt, you would not last the first winter. You need to read "The River Cottage Meat Book" by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rajiv
    replied
    Re: The Myth of the Slow Crash

    Originally posted by Verrocchio View Post
    1000 gold coins
    Correction: It should have said 1000 golden coins!

    Leave a comment:


  • Verrocchio
    replied
    Re: The Myth of the Slow Crash

    Originally posted by c1ue View Post
    Buy yer Financial Apocalypse Survival Tackle kits here! [FAST(tm)]

    1) 10 kW solar array
    2) 'Mad Max' style solar/fuel cell 4x4 with armor, spare run flat tires, 40 gallon spare fuel tank
    3) Stash of 1000 gold coins
    4) 2 years per person of MREs
    5) water filter and 100 gallon water tank
    6) club card at North Sierra Nevada mountains survival club
    7) shotgun with 500 rounds mixed 00 and solid slugs
    8) 30.06 rifle with 200 rounds
    9) .22 rifle with 1000 rounds (for game)
    10) 30 pounds of mixed spices
    11) 30 bottles of assorted liquers
    12) Crate of assorted medicines including antibiotics, cough/cold, antifungal

    All for the bargain basement price of $500,000! plus $10,000 per extra person.:eek:
    Hmm, the kit includes 1000 gold coins and the other goodies, too? And for only $500k? I'll take your entire inventory.;)

    Leave a comment:


  • GRG55
    replied
    Re: The Myth of the Slow Crash

    Originally posted by Fred View Post
    New Myth of the Slow Crash story:

    Employers Cut Jobs in August
    September 7, 2007 (Jeannine Aversa – AP Economics Writer)

    Employers Cut Payrolls by 4,000 in August, the First Drop in US Jobs in 4 Years

    Employers sliced payrolls by 4,000 in August, the first drop in four years, a stark sign that a painful credit crunch that has unnerved Wall Street is putting a strain on the national economy.
    Originally posted by Chris Coles View Post
    Fund Of Hedge Funds To Blame?

    09-05-2007 | Source: Hedge Fund Daily

    Redemption requests in July by investors in funds of hedge funds may have been the primary cause for the huge market sell-off this summer and its impact on the HF industry, according to the first Trim Tabs BarclayHedge Fund report.


    ” Biderman said. The good news is that all August HF redemption requests are in and, he noted, “more massive deleveraging in the hedge fund world is unlikely unless something deemed unexpected bad news materializes this month.”

    http://www.institutionalinvestor.com...7&LS=EMS139701
    That probably qualifies as "unexpected bad news"...

    Leave a comment:


  • FRED
    replied
    Re: The Myth of the Slow Crash

    New Myth of the Slow Crash story:

    Employers Cut Jobs in August
    September 7, 2007 (Jeannine Aversa – AP Economics Writer)

    Employers Cut Payrolls by 4,000 in August, the First Drop in US Jobs in 4 Years

    Employers sliced payrolls by 4,000 in August, the first drop in four years, a stark sign that a painful credit crunch that has unnerved Wall Street is putting a strain on the national economy.

    Leave a comment:


  • GRG55
    replied
    Re: The Myth of the Slow Crash

    Originally posted by Chris Coles View Post
    Fund Of Hedge Funds To Blame?...

    Redemption requests in July by investors in funds of hedge funds may have been the primary cause for the huge market sell-off this summer and its impact on the HF industry, according to the first Trim Tabs BarclayHedge Fund report.


    ” Biderman said. The good news is that all August HF redemption requests are in and, he noted, “more massive deleveraging in the hedge fund world is unlikely unless something deemed unexpected bad news materializes this month.”
    Hubris writ large..."it must be the fault of all those unsophisiticated investors in fund of funds..."

    The hedgies are likely no where near finished marking to market. This sort of nonsense sounds much like: "sub-prime is contained", "housing has bottomed" and "the economy is strong"...and about as accurate. LOL

    Leave a comment:


  • bill
    replied
    Re: The Myth of the Slow Crash

    Originally posted by GRG55 View Post
    The Economist Intelligence Unit has published a report titled "Heading for the Rocks - will financial turmoil sink the world economy?" It contains some scenarios for the major economic regions. The link below...

    http://a330.g.akamai.net/7/330/25828...he%20rocks.pdf

    Nice report, thank you

    The report confirms the unwinding of trades, paper freeze with reappraisal going forward, liquidity drying up, asset price and commodities down globally.

    Flippers, speculators feel the liquidity squeeze and many investors run for safety. Who will be in a position to take advantage of such a buying opportunity? On page 30 the report mentions SWF as being a potential purchaser of assets when assets sell off. I agree, as said in my previous post http://www.itulip.com/forums/showthr...1992#post11992 the potential capital pool would have to be big and global.

    SWF's will have to be politically positioned, no problem just call up an Investment Banker they will immediately dispatch a team over to help you.
    http://biz.yahoo.com/ft/070902/fto09...1368.html?.v=1
    September 2, 12:55 pm ET
    Investment banks are creating dedicated teams in London, Hong Kong and Japan to advise sovereign wealth funds and cash in on the growing wave of activity from government investment companies.

    Bankers also expect SWFs to take advantage of the credit crunch to undertake deals while private equity groups, unable to raise financing, are forced to sit on the sidelines. "The current investment climate has created a huge opportunity for many of these funds and they have become very real competitors to both private equity and strategic players," said Jeffrey Culpepper, head of investment banking for the Middle East and north Africa at Merrill Lynch.
    Keep a eye on Japan ’s prospective SWF http://www.reuters.com/article/marke...0070905?rpc=44 it may invest Japan ’s Sovereign Pension Fund GPIF.http://www.morganstanley.com/views/gsb/index.html
    Sovereign Pension Funds
    August 28, 2007

    By Stephen L. Jen

    While the emergence of sovereign wealth funds (SWFs) will be one of the key trends for the financial markets in the coming years, investors should also pay attention to some prospective changes in the way some of the sovereign pension funds (SPFs) may be invested. Specifically, we believe that we will witness a general rise in SPFs' exposure to foreign assets and riskier assets (i.e., equities), with logical implications for the global financial markets.
    Numerous examples of SPFs which are 'outward oriented' and not risk-averse. Singapore's GIC manages part of Singapore's official reserves and the Central Provident Fund (CPF). Australia's Future Fund and NZ's Superannuation Fund are likely to have 80% of their portfolios in foreign assets. South Korea's National Pension Service (NPS) is large (US$220 billion) and will increasingly raise its foreign content. Last but not least, Japan's Government Pension Investment Fund (GPIF) - currently at US$1.37 trillion - will export another US$58 billion in the next two years, and possibly a further US$150-200 billion beyond 2009.
    SPFs are large. The SPFs of the G10 countries total US$4.4 trillion. This is a large sum compared to the US$2.6 trillion managed by SWFs.
    SPFs currently have a low exposure to foreign assets. The weighted average foreign exposure is only 19% for the SPFs in the G10 countries.
    This will change, however. Global aging (declining fertility and mortality rates) will exert pressure on the SPFs to enhance their investment returns, and globalisation will encourage a reduction in the 'home bias' of these funds - precisely the same pressures that will propel SWFs. In my view, SPFs and SWFs should be considered collectively as a major factor for international financial markets in the coming years, as several SPFs may in fact become managed by SWFs in the future. Specifically, Japan's prospective SWF may be centred on its SPF - the GPIF.
    Last edited by bill; 09-05-07, 08:47 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chris Coles
    replied
    Re: The Myth of the Slow Crash

    Fund Of Hedge Funds To Blame?

    09-05-2007 | Source: Hedge Fund Daily

    Redemption requests in July by investors in funds of hedge funds may have been the primary cause for the huge market sell-off this summer and its impact on the HF industry, according to the first Trim Tabs BarclayHedge Fund report.


    ” Biderman said. The good news is that all August HF redemption requests are in and, he noted, “more massive deleveraging in the hedge fund world is unlikely unless something deemed unexpected bad news materializes this month.”

    http://www.institutionalinvestor.com...7&LS=EMS139701

    Leave a comment:


  • FRED
    replied
    Re: The Myth of the Slow Crash

    Today's Fast Economic Crash News:

    Lay-offs surge 85 pct in Aug vs July: survey

    Pending Home Sales Hit 6-Year Low

    Leave a comment:

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