PDA

View Full Version : Drinking Water from Fog-Drip--- the Latest Fad on the West Coast



Starving Steve
12-21-07, 07:12 PM
Here is the latest fad from the eco-nuts on the West Coast: gathering potable water from fog-drip. Without some research, the idea would seem to make sense since the West Coast has plenty of dense fog. Also, some trees such as Monterey pines and coastal redwood trees naturally augment their water supply by collecting fog-drip on their needles or leaves and letting it rain-down onto the soil below.

But the rubber meets the road where fog-drip has been harvested: at Punta Baja, near Rosario, Baja Cal. Norte, Mexico, some 250 miles south of San Diego, California. And at Punta Baja, a seaside village of 60 people, 30 fog collectors each 100 square feet in area were installed by the University of Baja California at Ensenada.

By actually doing the harvesting, the University of BCN found that 10 gallons of fresh water per capita in the village could be obtained daily on average from fog-drip using this system of 30 fog collectors.

http://www.sdreader.com/php/cityshow.php?id=44

An average person per day needs at minimum 100 gallons of water for household use. So unless I am missing something important here, 10 g/d would be just enough water to flush one toilet (using flow-restriction design) three times per day. Or 10g/day might be just enough to cook one meal and provide drinking drinking water on the table with the food and provide water to wash the dishes after the meal.

Or, 10g/d fresh water might suffice for drinking water, making coffee, and brushing one's teeth, but a household might have to use a secondary water source ( recycled sewage or raw seawater ) for all other domestic uses such as flushing toilets, showers, washing clothes, etc.

Imagine the cost of building homes with dual plumbing: one plumbing system for fog-drip water for drinking, the other for dispensing seawater or sewage for all other household uses. And then compare those plumbing costs to the disposable incomes of rural Baja California residents.

But as with solar power and wind power schemes, don't confuse the eco-nuts with the economic facts of engineering their ideas. So, fog-drip is now the latest fad on the West Coast with the Greens.

Meanwhile, nuclear power which could provide bountiful energy to de-salinate seawater at the cost of 50cents per cubic metre is over-looked. The nuclear power solution to the water shortage on the desert West Coast is still, "off the table" . :rolleyes:

Tulpen
12-21-07, 07:34 PM
You color your reporting IMHO, I suggest others to read the complete article.

By the way do you realize not everybody in the world "requires" the ample water resources per capita in the USA?

metalman
12-21-07, 08:12 PM
Here is the latest fad from the eco-nuts on the West Coast: gathering potable water from fog-drip. Without some research, the idea would seem to make sense since the West Coast has plenty of dense fog. Also, some trees such as Monterey pines and coastal redwood trees naturally augment their water supply by collecting fog-drip on their needles or leaves and letting it rain-down onto the soil below.

But the rubber meets the road where fog-drip has been harvested: at Punta Baja, near Rosario, Baja Cal. Norte, Mexico, some 250 miles south of San Diego, California. And at Punta Baja, a seaside village of 60 people, 30 fog collectors each 100 square feet in area were installed by the University of Baja California at Ensenada.

By actually doing the harvesting, the University of BCN found that 10 gallons of fresh water per capita in the village could be obtained daily on average from fog-drip using this system of 30 fog collectors.

http://www.sdreader.com/php/cityshow.php?id=44

An average person per day needs at minimum 100 gallons of water for household use. So unless I am missing something important here, 10 g/d would be just enough water to flush one toilet (using flow-restriction design) three times per day. Or 10g/day might be just enough to cook one meal and provide drinking drinking water on the table with the food and provide water to wash the dishes after the meal.

Or, 10g/d fresh water might suffice for drinking water, making coffee, and brushing one's teeth, but a household might have to use a secondary water source ( recycled sewage or raw seawater ) for all other domestic uses such as flushing toilets, showers, washing clothes, etc.

Imagine the cost of building homes with dual plumbing: one plumbing system for fog-drip water for drinking, the other for dispensing seawater or sewage for all other household uses. And then compare those plumbing costs to the disposable incomes of rural Baja California residents.

But as with solar power and wind power schemes, don't confuse the eco-nuts with the economic facts of engineering their ideas. So, fog-drip is now the latest fad on the West Coast with the Greens.

Meanwhile, nuclear power which could provide bountiful energy to de-salinate seawater at the cost of 50cents per cubic metre is over-looked. The nuclear power solution to the water shortage on the desert West Coast is still, "off the table" . :rolleyes:

i'm with you on the anti eco-nut angle. we need nukes. i read this twice before i realized you were saying " fog-drip" not "frog-drip".

i was thinking, wow, these ca freaks are out there drinking frog drip. gallons of it! yow!

but it just dew rolling off trees. someone's collecting it? i bet that's bad for the local ecology. that drip's been there a while so the ecosystem depends on it, like the moss and other animals underneath. now we got these freaks exploiting this resource. maybe send the japanese there to protest.

Starving Steve
12-21-07, 10:04 PM
i'm with you on the anti eco-nut angle. we need nukes. i read this twice before i realized you were saying " fog-drip" not "frog-drip".

i was thinking, wow, these ca freaks are out there drinking frog drip. gallons of it! yow!

but it just dew rolling off trees. someone's collecting it? i bet that's bad for the local ecology. that drip's been there a while so the ecosystem depends on it, like the moss and other animals underneath. now we got these freaks exploiting this resource. maybe send the japanese there to protest.

Hi Metalman:

Thanks for your comment.

I have stood by Monterey pines during episodes of dense wind-blown sea fog in summer, and I have witnessed full-blown actual rainstorms underneath them, complete with rain puddles. So fog-drip is an interesting and important phenomenon, especially if you are a pine-tree.

As for eco-nuts, I am a member of the California Green Party, but I am one member who is a strong supporter of atomic energy for peaceful uses.

And speaking of the peaceful use of atomic energy to benefit mankind, there was a 3cent stamp in the U.S. when I was a young boy, "Atoms for Peace" issued in 1957 or 1958; that is where my mind is at to this day.

Contemptuous
12-21-07, 10:55 PM
As for eco-nuts, I am a member of the California Green Party, but I am one member who is a strong supporter of atomic energy for peaceful uses.

That's cool in my book. I GROK your position starving Steve.

Er, ... Starving Steve, meet Metalman - one of the orneriest inhabitants of this community. But he's a good egg, underneath the irascible crocodile exterior. I see he's being real civil towards you - that's unusual. You must have made a good impression. Not easy to please that guy. :D

Starving Steve
12-22-07, 12:41 AM
You color your reporting IMHO, I suggest others to read the complete article.

By the way do you realize not everybody in the world "requires" the ample water resources per capita in the USA?

Dear Tulpen:

Thank you for your reply.

As far as the need of a human-being to have at minimum 100gallons per day for drinking water and domestic use, that amount would not even cover the need for watering plants outside, nor would it cover lawn watering needs, nor car-washing--- even with a rag and pail.

I believe every human-being on Earth is entitled to the best standard of living this planet can provide equally to everyone. And if people now have to grope for water from fog-drip on blankets to survive (and then only get 10% of their basic minimum human need from fog-drip and have to bathe and wash clothes in brown water), then I have issues with the way this planet is being planned and governed.

People need abundant cheap fresh water. And people need abundant cheap energy. And people need food, shelther, healthcare, and job opportunities.

Finally, environmentalists should be respect these legitimate needs of people. Instead of dreaming-up new taxes such as re-cycling fees, new regulations such as carbon-impact reports for all new developments, new complexities such as carbon credits and their accounting, and new lawsuits of every conceivable type against development, shouldn't environmentalists now be working to make life easier for mankind?

Shouldn't cities, for example, be made to be affordable and liveable for people, the human species? But somehow, that doesn't resonate with the environmentalists to-day; liveability and the welfare of mankind is not a high priority with them.

So, yes, man could live on just 10 gallons of fresh water per day. Man could live harvesting fog-drip and dew, but who would want to?

Rajiv
01-03-08, 09:48 AM
You may want to read the following article

BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | Why world's taps are running dry (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/2943946.stm)

GRG55
01-03-08, 11:36 AM
Here is the latest fad from the eco-nuts on the West Coast: gathering potable water from fog-drip. Without some research, the idea would seem to make sense since the West Coast has plenty of dense fog. Also, some trees such as Monterey pines and coastal redwood trees naturally augment their water supply by collecting fog-drip on their needles or leaves and letting it rain-down onto the soil below.

But the rubber meets the road where fog-drip has been harvested: at Punta Baja, near Rosario, Baja Cal. Norte, Mexico, some 250 miles south of San Diego, California. And at Punta Baja, a seaside village of 60 people, 30 fog collectors each 100 square feet in area were installed by the University of Baja California at Ensenada.

By actually doing the harvesting, the University of BCN found that 10 gallons of fresh water per capita in the village could be obtained daily on average from fog-drip using this system of 30 fog collectors.

http://www.sdreader.com/php/cityshow.php?id=44

An average person per day needs at minimum 100 gallons of water for household use. So unless I am missing something important here, 10 g/d would be just enough water to flush one toilet (using flow-restriction design) three times per day. Or 10g/day might be just enough to cook one meal and provide drinking drinking water on the table with the food and provide water to wash the dishes after the meal.

Or, 10g/d fresh water might suffice for drinking water, making coffee, and brushing one's teeth, but a household might have to use a secondary water source ( recycled sewage or raw seawater ) for all other domestic uses such as flushing toilets, showers, washing clothes, etc.

Imagine the cost of building homes with dual plumbing: one plumbing system for fog-drip water for drinking, the other for dispensing seawater or sewage for all other household uses. And then compare those plumbing costs to the disposable incomes of rural Baja California residents.

But as with solar power and wind power schemes, don't confuse the eco-nuts with the economic facts of engineering their ideas. So, fog-drip is now the latest fad on the West Coast with the Greens.

Meanwhile, nuclear power which could provide bountiful energy to de-salinate seawater at the cost of 50cents per cubic metre is over-looked. The nuclear power solution to the water shortage on the desert West Coast is still, "off the table" . :rolleyes:

The water desalination plants in the Arabian Gulf are predominantly flash units (operate slightly below atmospheric pressure) and use the waste heat of the gas turbine exhaust from power generation. Dropping the pressure lowers the boiling point and heat demand requirements.

However, with increasing population many more of these plants have been installed and there's now measurable salinity increases occuring in the near offshore waters off some of the Gulf states, particularly between Saudi Arabia and the Kingdom of Bahrain. Coastal California is not as protected as the Gulf, but I can imagine the eco-lobby in your state will have a field day with the salinity statistics, blocking these plants to save endangered aquatic species, especially those cute looking otters.

c1ue
01-03-08, 02:42 PM
Coastal California is not as protected as the Gulf, but I can imagine the eco-lobby in your state will have a field day with the salinity statistics, blocking these plants to save endangered aquatic species, especially those cute looking otters.

Not to mention the angry oyster farmers and oyster consumers.

I fall into the latter category.

Then there's the fishing charter people...