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FRED
08-01-07, 12:39 AM
The "James Cramer housing market revisionist" pulled from YouTube at TheStreet.com's request video...


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<embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/Wk44peDjLjU" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" height="350" width="425"></object>

The "James Cramer housing market revisionist (http://www.itulip.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1806)" video hosted at iTulip...

The "Approved by TheStreet.com Cramer Video (http://www.itulip.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1818)."

zoog
08-01-07, 01:03 AM
That's a good one. I like the music, there's almost a hint of Jaws theme there for a sec. Come to think of it, he kinda resembles Richard Dreyfuss in a certain way.

http://img161.imageshack.us/img161/3275/dreyfusscramerhf6.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

DanielLCharts
08-01-07, 11:15 PM
It's like watching a kid in college trying to sound like an expert while leading a class discussion on a book he didn't read.

Tet
08-02-07, 01:22 AM
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<embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/Wk44peDjLjU" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" height="350"></embed></OBJECT>


He's got a very shiny head, the glare off his head makes it so I'm not quite so sure if I should buy these subprime packages, or if I should buy a lot of them. I've got money stuffed in ironing boards that aren't making any return, now why wouldn't I take some of that money and try to get a 30% return? Only one sure bet to make with the shiny headed Cramer and that's to ALWAYS buy what he's trashing.

cakins
08-02-07, 02:10 AM
The housing bubble is definitely out in the mainstream. Makes me wonder if the bottom won't be reached sooner rather than later.

Tet
08-02-07, 10:02 AM
The housing bubble is definitely out in the mainstream. Makes me wonder if the bottom won't be reached sooner rather than later.
Only so many of these 30% packages out there, certainly not enough to share and it doesn't look like Cramer is doing any sharing. Buy what he's trashing.

BillMasi
08-02-07, 10:13 AM
*Excellent* video editing job.

FRED
08-02-07, 11:57 AM
Only so many of these 30% packages out there, certainly not enough to share and it doesn't look like Cramer is doing any sharing. Buy what he's trashing.

Whether you buy or sell according to Cramer, you still don't beat Leonard the Wonder Monkey.

Since November 1, 2005, Jim and Leonard's overall records are:

Jim Cramer - 138 wins, 138 losses, 48 ties
Leonard the Wonder Monkey - 138 wins, 138 losses, 48 ties

Ongoing Stats:
Jim Cramer is right 49.27% of the time.
Jim Cramer's picks average a 0.24% ROI after 30 days.

Leonard the Wonder Monkey is right 49.95% of the time.
Leonard's picks average a 0.43% ROI after 30 days.

Cramerwatch.org (http://www.cramerwatch.org/)

Abrey
08-02-07, 02:02 PM
Dear Fred: I personally don't have anything against Cramer. My roommate watches him all the time. I find his style annoying: it reminds me of a typical Fox 'News' show. To me, he's just another broadcast hack trying to make a living. I can't begrudge anyone trying to make a living. Like the RE bubble, he's done pretty well. So far. Has anyone else benefited from his 'advice'? Does anybody know? RE isn't the only thing Cramer talks about. My roommate never talks about him so I don't have any firsthand reports. As far as I know, the basic financial advice: spend with prudence, slowly save your money, budget accordingly, do your research, predates Cramer by generations. What is his appeal? Does he represent a form of 'tough love' to the average viewer? are they scared or uninformed or both? In a way, he represents to me the MSM these days. Six months too late and a bellwether that the Smart Money better have moved on before he alerts the masses. Which brings up another question. How much of what he does is mere showmanship; and how much is any effort, sincere, disingenous or otherwise, to inform his viewing audience? Just my thoughts. Thanks again for posting this video and your ongoing commentary of all things financial. Regards, Abrey

Jim Nickerson
08-02-07, 02:17 PM
I've said on these pages probably more than once, that perhaps 3-4 years ago now, I stopped watching financial news on TV, the main reason for me it was an on-going distraction from being able to think.

Is anyone willing to post something they have garnered from financial TV that has led to a really worthwhile investment decision? If there are not numerous responses to this that demonstrate apparent value, it would seem it offers proof to the lack of real value to watching financial TV.

istt
08-02-07, 04:35 PM
I am in complete agreement with you, Jim. In fact, I recall well how this amateur, Jim Cramer, was pounding the table at the peak of the dot com collapse telling everyone how they had to own all the high fliers. To emphasize his point he said, "JDSU stands for Just Don't Sell Us." Wise Neil Cavuto as well dismissed a guest when the guest suggested the market could be down for some time. Larry Kudlow acts the same way towards guests who think we could be heading into a bear market. Notice how he always has at least 3 bulls to 1 bear and then proceeds to ridicule the lone bear. We'll see how Kudlow's Goldilocks market holds up over the next few months.

FRED
08-02-07, 04:39 PM
I am in complete agreement with you, Jim. In fact, I recall well how this amateur, Jim Cramer, was pounding the table at the peak of the dot com collapse telling everyone how they had to own all the high fliers. To emphasize his point he said, "JDSU stands for Just Don't Sell Us." Wise Neil Cavuto as well dismissed a guest when the guest suggested the market could be down for some time. Larry Kudlow acts the same way towards guess who think we could be heading into a bear market. Notice how he always has at least 3 bulls to 1 bear and then proceeds to ridicule the lone bear. We'll see how Kudlow's Goldilocks market holds up over the next few months.

Good thing for Cramer, sheeple have short memories (http://www.itulip.com/awards.htm#Cramer).

metalman
08-02-07, 06:32 PM
Good thing for Cramer, sheeple have short memories (http://www.itulip.com/awards.htm#Cramer).

isn't cramer just an ad for stock index funds? by your own post...


Since November 1, 2005, Jim and Leonard's overall records are:

Jim Cramer - 138 wins, 138 losses, 48 ties
Leonard the Wonder Monkey - 138 wins, 138 losses, 48 ties

Ongoing Stats:
Jim Cramer is right 49.27% of the time.
Jim Cramer's picks average a 0.24% ROI after 30 days.

Leonard the Wonder Monkey is right 49.95% of the time.
Leonard's picks average a 0.43% ROI after 30 days.

cramer isn't good or bad. he's just a friggin' huge waste of time.

Green Bear
08-03-07, 04:39 PM
We have Armageddon....

http://www.cnbc.com/id/15840232?video=452808336&play=1

Tet
08-03-07, 04:51 PM
We have Armageddon....

http://www.cnbc.com/id/15840232?video=452808336&play=1

:) For such a bloodbath there didn't appear to be a whole lot of conviction in the selling today, volumes were well below normal for everything I lost my ass on today. Cramer asking Bernieboy to lower rates to help save Wall Street jobs is pretty funny, I wonder how many real jobs get created for each Wall Street job that is lost.

Jim Nickerson
08-03-07, 05:06 PM
:) For such a bloodbath there didn't appear to be a whole lot of conviction in the selling today, volumes were well below normal for everything I lost my ass on today. Cramer asking Bernieboy to lower rates to help save Wall Street jobs is pretty funny, I wonder how many real jobs get created for each Wall Street job that is lost.

Volumes today did not appear to surpass the highs of Thursday last week, but volumes for 10 out of the last 11 days , including today, have been in the range of approaching the top 5 percentile of daily volumes going back at least a couple of years. Today was not a below normal volume day according to the data I collect--which are not final figures until about 6PM EDT.

Perhaps the sellers have not gotten serious yet in selling the things you own--maybe Monday they'll get serious.

Tet
08-03-07, 05:32 PM
Volumes today did not appear to surpass the highs of Thursday last week, but volumes for 10 out of the last 11 days , including today, have been in the range of approaching the top 5 percentile of daily volumes going back at least a couple of years. Today was not a below normal volume day according to the data I collect--which are not final figures until about 6PM EDT.

Perhaps the sellers have not gotten serious yet in selling the things you own--maybe Monday they'll get serious.

All requires serious buyers to get serious sellers, you don't unload something because you think it's going higher and you don't buy something because you think it's going lower. To me it doesn't look like the Street is playing with enough of other peoples money just yet, need a lot more of Jane and Joe's money to really want to blow this out of the water. Stocks are still a very, very hard sell, funny our 401K guy did his enrollment pitch last Wednesday just before Thursday's meltdown. Our mix is still more bonds than stocks, that needs to change for Wall Street to make a lot of money taking this a lot lower. I notice our 401K doesn't have any Rydex Short funds to profit from these moments and Joe and Jane can only bet one direction. This is one of those moments that explain why you can have a horse race, if we all knew which horse to bet on you certainly couldn't have one. If I was short here I'd be taking my profits away from the table right now, that was a very good run. The first guy to cover gets the bounce started.

grapejelly
08-03-07, 05:43 PM
contraryinvestor.com Brian Pretti has shown even as recently as Thursday that the money in the market isn't the individual investor's money. The public are not in the market. The hot money *is* in the market -- the institutional guys trying to at least tread water. They will sell on a dime. Very scared money. That's what we have been seeing lately.

Why isn't the public in the market?

Tapped out. Borrowed to the hilt.

Nothing left to use to invest in stocks.

Tet
08-03-07, 05:52 PM
contraryinvestor.com Brian Pretti has shown even as recently as Thursday that the money in the market isn't the individual investor's money. The public are not in the market. The hot money *is* in the market -- the institutional guys trying to at least tread water. They will sell on a dime. Very scared money. That's what we have been seeing lately.

Why isn't the public in the market?

Tapped out. Borrowed to the hilt.

Nothing left to use to invest in stocks.

That's my view as well, the sharks don't like to steal from each other either. Now where does Joe and Jane have their money? Where is there money the sharks can steal from, looks like they're looting real estate right now. What's next after the real estate heist? Oil maybe? A little gold and silver certainly. Looks like some foreign currencies and foreign markets Wall Street can loot from. It's the Fed's job to create bubbles and the stock market is just now catching up to where it started out six years ago, that's not much of a bubble, especially with Uncle Buck trading at 80.